Karimikui

kr 120,00Price

extraordinary. if you're looking for something truly speciel, this kenyan coffee is packed with blackcurrant and raspberry and has a buttery body. topped of with a nice milk chocolate and raspberry cream aftertaste.

 

Well suited for both filter and espresso.

 

CS: 90

Amount
  • ORIGIN

    Country | Kenya

    Region | Kirinyaga

    Washing station | Karimiku

    Elevation | 1,650 masl

    Lot# | 140

    Screen size | AB

     

    Beans | Arabica, SL28/SL34

    Processing | Cherries are hand sorted for unripes and overripes by the farmers before they go in to production. A disc pulping machine removes the skin and pulp. The coffees are graded by density in to 3 grades by the pulp­er. Grade 1 and 2 go separately to fermentation. Grade 3 is considered low grade. The coffee is fermented for 16-24 hours under closed shade. After fermentation the coffees are washed and again graded by density in wash­ing channels and are then soaked under clean water from the Gatomboya stream for 16-18 hours.

     

    Drying: Sun dried up to 21 days on African drying beds. Coffees are covered in plas­tic during midday and at night.

  • LEARN

    FARMING AND PRODUCTION

    The Cooperative Societies are the umbrella organization for one or several wetmills. Typically you have the Tekangu society that represents the wetmills Tegu, Karogoto and Ngunguru. The wet mills in Kenya are called Factories, e.g. Karogoto Factory.

    A typical wet mill can have about 1000 farmers delivering cherries. They give a small advance payment at delivery. The better and well-managed wet mills are able to give more than 85% of the sales price back to the farmers. That’s after cost of milling and marketing is deducted.
     

    CHERRY DELIVERY

    Is done at the wet mills or at collection centers. When the farmers arrive at the place for delivery they would normally have to empty their bags on the floor (on a cover) to sort out unripe, overripe and CBD infected cherries.
     

    PULPING

    When they start the pulper the cherries go by gravity in to the machine. They normally use disc pulpers such as old three disc Agaarde or similar brands. The parchment flows from the discs with water allowing the parchment to be separated by density. The densest beans will sink and are pumped straight through a channel to the fermentation tank as P1 (parchment 1 and is what we generally are buying.
     

    FERMENTATION

    After pulping, the coffees are dry fermented (water is drained off) in painted concrete tanks. Normally they are fermented for 18-24 hours. Many factories do intermediate washing every 6 – 8 hours, meaning they add water, stir up the parchment and drain it again.
     

    WASHING AND SOAKING

    When fermentation is completed and the mucilage is disolved the parchment gets washed in washing channels and graded again by density. The lighter beans will float off and the remaining dense parchment will normally be soaked in clean water up to 24 hours.
     

    DRYING AND CONDITIONING

    After soaking, the coffees are skin dried at hessian mesh mats for skin drying up to one day. After a day the coffees are moved to the traditional drying tables. The coffee is then normally dried on a surface of jute clothing or shade net on top of the wire mesh.

    The drying time varies between 12 and 20 days depending on weather and rainfall.

     

    MILLING

    The dry mills in Kenya works very well and are highly professional and efficient. The coffees goes through their standard grading systems:
     

    E (Elephant beans) = screen 19 and up, AA = 17/18, AB = 16/17, PB = Peaberries.
     

    In the mill everything is kept separate for the auction, and it’s a great opportunity to cup through the different grades from the same outturns and consignments.